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Two tips for making shooting news reports easier

If you want to make it in the world of TV or online news reporting, or if you're already in the industry and looking for extra tips to up your game, there are always ways you can improve your filming technique to make the whole process easier. We all know the drill - buy a good microphone for recording, try to interview in quieter spots and remember to wear headphones to check sound levels - but what else can do you to get a better video report?

Here we take a look at two tips.

Ask anyone who has tried to wrangle metres-worth of audio cables in a hurry and they will likely tout the benefits of using wireless microphones.

Shoot to edit

In the world of increasing digital memory space and the habit to just keep rolling, it might seem like a good idea to shoot all the cool shots you think tell your story, ready to be reordered in post at a later date.

However, as journalism school Poynter Institute points out, it would be better practice to 'shoot to edit'. This means filming a report in the sequence you would cut it together into, meaning less time in post production. This could be valuable in the often fast-turnaround world of news, where there is little to no time to piece together 30 minutes of raw, out of order clips.

Consider new sound recording technology

Ask anyone who has tried to wrangle metres-worth of audio cables in a hurry and they will likely tout the benefits of using wireless microphones. These allow you to get a reporter on camera and speaking in much less time, without worrying about where cables may lie between the camera or soundie and the mic.

We recommend checking out our new RØDELink Newsshooter Kit. This comes with an XLR transmitter that can be plugged into a handheld or shotgun mic, which will transmit a clear, quality and consistent signal to the camera-mounted receiver. Power won't be an issue, either, as the transmitter runs off AA batteries and can provide 48-volts of phantom power to your mic. The receiver also runs off AA batteries, or via microUSB.

Our RØDELink products work up to 100 metres apart, and run on a Series II 2.4 gigahertz encrypted signal to provide a stable transmission. Even better, it uses one-touch sync technology for rapid setup, so you can have more time reporting news and less time fluffing about trying to get things to work.